Tag Archives: Body Impoliltic

Photos From New York

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Laurie says:

I’m back after a trip to New York City and New England. I’m doing almost no travel for the next few months and will be posting regularly.

There were a few beautiful images that I saw while I was there.  These are the two that I photographed successfully.
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It was taken at the Cloisters, a museum of medieval art constructed from pieces of four monasteries and abbeys that were brought to Fort Tryon Park and rebuilt into the museum. The reconstructed cloisters are surrounded by early medieval gardens and a series of indoor chapels and rooms grouped by period and source location. It’s remarkably successful and the art is stunning.
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This was taken just before a thunderstorm from the 22nd floor of a building near 46th St and Fifth Ave. A few blocks away, the first place I ever worked was replaced by a mirrored skyscraper.

Please click on photos for details and close-ups; it adds a lot.

My Photograph in Ryan Gander’s Osaka Museum Exhibition

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Laurie says:

Bob Guter

I am especially delighted that my portrait of Bob Guter from Familiar Men is included in the “Ryan Gander -These wings aren’t for flying’’ exhibition opening today at the National Museum of Art, Osaka. I admire the complexity and uniqueness and diversity of Gander’s work and the way disability consciousness is woven and not woven into it.

His work is so diverse that there is no way that only four choices give a sense of his scope

This solo exhibition will present approximately 60 important and new works by Gander, who is now regarded as a standard-bearer of new conceptual art. As the mysterious title suggests, the exhibition promises to escort us to an unknown world.

At the same time, Gander will curate an exhibit made up of works from the museum collection. Using the instinctive human ability to think in terms of comparisons as a premise, Gander will present the works in numerous pairs. Though based on a physical resemblance, the fact that the pieces are derived from different genres and eras will inspire a host of fresh perspectives. And the exhibition, held throughout the entire museum, will allow us to experience the limitless potential of the visual arts. – from the Museum description

He describes this: “It is a self-portrait in the worst possible position”.

His work is formally diverse and has included, “a chess set, a new word, a children’s book, jewellery, customised sportswear, glass orb paperweights and maps,” as well as photography, films, and drawings. Considering Gander’s work, “Appendix”, art critic Mark Beasley said: “It’s an unwieldy yet fascinatingly open account, somewhat like lucid dreaming, which shows the artist at his most arch, open and revealing … an attempt to discuss practice in a form sympathetic to the work in discussion.”
… most of Gander’s art is completely removed from the hand of the artist and carried out by a team of technical specialists. He is often physically incapable of carrying out the making of the work himself. Wikipedia

I’m fascinated and impatient to see what art work my portrait will be paired with. I’ll be writing more about this after the exhibition is up. Meanwhile I’m excited.