Category Archives: Exhibitions

Exhibition: The Museum of Capitalism

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Laurie says:

I went with Debbie to the Museum of Capitalism, a remarkable exhibition installed in what was a huge empty retail space in Jack London Square in Oakland. The exhibition is a art/historical view of capitalism as if it no longer existed. Unfortunately I got there rather late, as it only runs til August 20th.

From the curators’ statement by FICTILUIS:

Some may argue that the events the Museum highlights are too recent in memory to be displayed in such a way, that the topic is too sensitive for those who still feel it’s effects. Others argue that it’s too late, that reflection upon the logics and limits of capitalism should have happened long ago, and might have prevented many of the tragedies that have played out in recent decades. We maintain that there is no better time then now to honor those impacted by capitalism and those who will feel its impacts far into the future.

The exhibition includes over 50 artists and is very varied in subjects, attitudes and media. I’m going to write about the work that struck me the most. It’s by Beverly Henry.
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In the installation Undoing Time/PLEDGE, a video portrait co-authored with former prisoner Beverly Henry (who worked in a California prison flag factory while incarcerated), is installed with two American flags produced in the flag factory where she worked during the the years she was incarcerated at the Central California Women’s facility.
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The text of an op-ed piece Beverly wrote on the 254th anniversary of Betsy Ross’ birth is embroidered into the stripes of the flags. In the video Beverly performs a symbolic act – undoing the stitches of one of the flags made in the prison factory – while she describes her own search for equality and democracy as a socio-economically marginalized person. In the op-ed text, and through her recorded statements, Beverly’s reflections, on the promise of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness that the US flag purportedly represents, challenge us to examine the structural inequalities at the root of the extraordinary expansion of penal confinement in the United States.
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This is an image from the video of her taking the flag apart as an act of reclamation.

If you are interested in learning more about the exhibition, there is a good article here by Kriston Capps

And if you’re in the Bay Area and you can see it before the 20th, go!

My Photograph in Ryan Gander’s Osaka Museum Exhibition

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Laurie says:

Bob Guter

I am especially delighted that my portrait of Bob Guter from Familiar Men is included in the “Ryan Gander -These wings aren’t for flying’’ exhibition opening today at the National Museum of Art, Osaka. I admire the complexity and uniqueness and diversity of Gander’s work and the way disability consciousness is woven and not woven into it.

His work is so diverse that there is no way that only four choices give a sense of his scope

This solo exhibition will present approximately 60 important and new works by Gander, who is now regarded as a standard-bearer of new conceptual art. As the mysterious title suggests, the exhibition promises to escort us to an unknown world.

At the same time, Gander will curate an exhibit made up of works from the museum collection. Using the instinctive human ability to think in terms of comparisons as a premise, Gander will present the works in numerous pairs. Though based on a physical resemblance, the fact that the pieces are derived from different genres and eras will inspire a host of fresh perspectives. And the exhibition, held throughout the entire museum, will allow us to experience the limitless potential of the visual arts. – from the Museum description

He describes this: “It is a self-portrait in the worst possible position”.

His work is formally diverse and has included, “a chess set, a new word, a children’s book, jewellery, customised sportswear, glass orb paperweights and maps,” as well as photography, films, and drawings. Considering Gander’s work, “Appendix”, art critic Mark Beasley said: “It’s an unwieldy yet fascinatingly open account, somewhat like lucid dreaming, which shows the artist at his most arch, open and revealing … an attempt to discuss practice in a form sympathetic to the work in discussion.”
… most of Gander’s art is completely removed from the hand of the artist and carried out by a team of technical specialists. He is often physically incapable of carrying out the making of the work himself. Wikipedia

I’m fascinated and impatient to see what art work my portrait will be paired with. I’ll be writing more about this after the exhibition is up. Meanwhile I’m excited.