Laurie Toby Edison

Photographer

Archive for the 'Art' Category

Aerial Photography Re-imagined

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

Laurie says: I’m back from Detroit and the Sojourner Truth archive in Battle Creek.  I’ll have a lot to say about this next week.  But I want to think about it for a while. This post is about drones used for a new kind of aerial photography.  They have a far closer range and different perspectives […]

Julian Dimock: Photographs Of African-Americans – South Carolina 1905

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Laurie says: This extraordinary collection of Dimock’s work has recently been put on line by The Museum of Natural History. Given the obvious quality of the work on line, I’m hoping sometime to have a chance to see the originals. I am initially struck by the brilliant and respectful photographs he took of African Americans […]

Ansel Adams: Photographs Of The Manzanar Relocation Center

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

Laurie says: Ansel Adams is known as a magnificent 20th century photographer of black and white of landscapes of the West. But he said that “from a social point of view,” his Manzanar photos were the “most important thing I’ve done or can do, as far as I know.” .. Landscape with watch tower .. […]

Photographs In 2014 National Queer Arts Festival

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

Laurie says: I’m delighted to have 2 of my nude portraits in Body, body, bodies, a feature exhibition of the 2014 National Queer Arts Festival in San Francisco. One is of my friend Tee Corinne (taken shortly before her death in 2006). Tee was a groundbreaking Lesbian erotic artist whose works included The Cunt Coloring […]

Julia Margaret Cameron: The Art of Imperfection

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Laurie says: I wish I could say that my work was influenced by Julia Cameron’s portraits.  I’ve seen a fair number of the originals and I admire them a great deal.   But I didn’t find her work until my portrait style had been long established.  I think it’s possible that if I had discovered her […]

Fat Nudes As Old Masters

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Laurie says: I was sent a link to Fullerton-Batten’s photos of fat nudes. As someone who does portraits with the goal of capturing some essential sense of the model in their natural body language, I found both the work and the artist’s description of it thought provoking. .. .. She says: I have transposed the […]

My Work in US/Chinese Feminist Exhibition

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

Laurie Says: I wrote a few days ago about the US/Chinese feminist exhibition Half The Sky: Intersections of Social Practice Art in Shenyang, China at the Luxun Academy of Fine Arts. It runs from April 15th to the 30th. As I said, I’m delighted to be in the exhibition. The catlogue is beautiful and the […]

Chinese/US Feminist Exhibition in China

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

Laurie says: (We’re still dealing with the after effects of the website being hacked. Hopefully things will be running smoothly soon.) I wrote a while ago that my portrait of Fumiko Nakamura was part of an exhibit of Chinese and US women artists at the Luxon Academy of Fine Arts in Shenyang, China.  It’s an […]

Stunning Industrial Photography: Ethan Miller

Monday, March 17th, 2014

Laurie says: Fine industrial photography always impresses me. I appreciate the aesthetics of a well designed machine and the structural forms lend themselves to work that can have an abstract quality I particularly like. It’s not a subject matter that crops up a often in my work. But when I was in Iceland I had […]

Gracie Hagen : Illusions of the Body (NSFW)

Sunday, February 9th, 2014

Laurie says: These photos by Gracie Hagen eloquently express the illusions of the body that are reflected back at us from the innumerable media images that barrage us. My own nude portrait work was always focused on portraying a sense of the reality of the person I was photographing. Avoiding the expected stereotypical glamor poses […]

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Laurie Toby Edison by Carol Squires

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